Royal Military Police Soldier

Adjutant Generals Corps

"Travel, training, challenges - it's another world"

"There are always new things to learn, and it is a job with massive responsibility"

Policing is a very important job in the Armed Forces. The Royal Military Police (RMP) upholds law within the Army, in the UK and abroad. So as a Policeman or woman, you’ll get to travel the world and support operations. It all starts with first-class training - first as a soldier and then in policing.

When you finish, you'll be promoted to Lance Corporal. You'll know how to gather evidence and look after detainees. What's more, you can take specialist courses and qualifications. These are recognised by the civilian police. That means a great CV and an exciting future.

Training For The Role

Step 1
First, you become a highly skilled soldier with 14 weeks’ basic training.

Step 2
Then, you do the Initial Police and Driver Training course at the Defence School of Policing and Guarding. This lasts 24 weeks. You learn about police duties, investigations, handling evidence, military law and other areas of policing. Then it’s time for your first posting as an RMP Lance Corporal. Later, you can take further qualifications and training such as the Close Protection course. You could even join the Special Investigations Branch. It makes for a great CV that can take you far, inside or outside the Army.

Entry Requirements

Age: 17 years 6 months - 35 years 6 months
Qualifications:

GCSE Grade A–C / 9-4 in at least English Language and Maths (or Level 2 literacy and numeracy equivalent)

You must also pass Advanced Police disclosure checks

Fitness:
  • Mid Thigh Pull 46kg
  • Medicine Ball Throw 2.9m
  • 2km run 11m 15s (11m 30s for Junior Entry)
More information about the fitness test

Qualifications You Could Get After Training

  • Level 3 diploma in Defence Knowledge of Policing
  • Home Office approved policing qualifications

Rank Progression

Learn about rank progression here.

Pay and Benefits

From the Field

“I get to travel, I’m well paid and because police work is so varied, I’m not locked into a nine-to-five routine. I might be investigating cases or specialising in crime-scene work. There are always new things to learn, and it is a job with massive responsibility.”

HOW TO APPLY

Once your online application has been approved, you'll meet with a local recruiter. This is your chance to tell us about the role that you're interested in. When you go to the Assessment Centre,you'll take tests - the results will show whether you'd be suitable for this role, or should consider a different role.

Training For The Role

Step 1
You start with basic training, which teaches you to be a soldier. It happens over eight weekends, with a week-long residential course at the end.

Step 2
The next stage is a Military Police Course for Reservists. This is held at the Defence School of Policing & Guarding. It lasts two weeks. Here, you learn about police duties, investigations, handling evidence, military law and more. When you finish, you’ll be promoted to Lance Corporal and have a red beret. National Reservists will have at least 19 days’ training per year. If you serve locally, it’s 27 days.

Reservists get bonuses for completing training each year and annual pay rises.

Entry Requirements

Age: 17 years 9 months - 42 years 6 months
Fitness:
  • Mid Thigh Pull 46kg
  • Medicine Ball Throw 2.9m
  • 2km run 11m 15s (11m 30s for Junior Entry)
More information about the fitness test
Qualifications: <p>At least Grade C / 4&nbsp;in GCSE English and Maths (or level 2 literacy and numeracy equivalent) </p> <p> For the Special Investigations Branch reserve you must be in policing already</p>

Qualifications You Could Get After Training

Full UK driving licence. Home Office - approved police qualifications.

Pay and Benefits

You’ll get paid a day rate according to your rank, starting from £37.47 in training and rising to £46.42 per day once you’re a Private. This includes being paid for weekly drill nights. Plus, if you complete all of your annual training days, you’re entitled to a tax-free lump sum called a bounty.

More about Reserve benefits

From the Field

“I get to travel, I’m well paid and because police work is so varied, I’m not locked into a nine-to-five routine. I might be investigating cases or specialising in crime-scene work. There are always new things to learn, and it is a job with massive responsibility.”

HOW TO APPLY

Once your online application has been approved, you'll meet with a local recruiter. This is your chance to tell us about the role that you're interested in. When you go to the Assessment Centre,you'll take tests - the results will show whether you'd be suitable for this role, or should consider a different role.