Operator Military Intelligence

Intelligence Corps

This is available as a full time Army role.
This is available as a part time Army role.

UNDERSTAND THE SITUATION, CULTURE AND THE ENEMY.

"THE ARMY REALLY GOT BEHIND ME FROM THE START AND GAVE ME OPPORTUNITIES TO ADVANCE MY CAREER.”
As an Intelligence Operative you'll gather and analyse information that helps senior commanders make important decisions. You'll work in variety of roles and settings, from headquarters units to government departments, becoming a subject matter expert in a country or an enemy threat. You could write reports that inform commanders and politicians, patrol with the infantry to learn about the local situation, or briefing a commanding officer in the UK about a cyber-attack. It's a varied and fascinating role with masses of opportunity for development.

Training For The Role

Step 1
You'll start with your initial military training which will teach you how to be a soldier - this will cover everything from fieldcraft to how to handle a rifle. Your initial training will be at either Pirbright or Winchester and last for 14 weeks.

Step 2
You'll do your 15 week Phase 2 Training at the Joint Intelligence Training Group near Bedford. During this Phase of training you develop analytical, briefing intelligence specific skills to prepare you deploy anywhere in the world. On successful completion of this course you will attempt your Junior Command and Leadership course to promote to the rank of Lance Corporal.

Entry Requirements

Age: 17 years 9 months - 35 years 6 months
Qualifications: GCSE Grade A–C/9-4 in at least English Language and four other subjects. You must have at least Numeracy Level 2.
Fitness:
  • Mid Thigh Pull 46kg
  • Medicine Ball Throw 2.9m
  • 2km run 11m 15s (11m 30s for Junior Entry)
More information about the fitness test

Qualifications You Could Get After Training

  • Level 4 NVQ
  • All your training will go towards degree level credits in Intelligence and International Relations

Rank Progression

Learn about rank progression here.

Pay and Benefits

From the Field

“My first posting was to Northern Ireland, helping the Irish Guards gather intelligence. I was then sent to London to produce papers on Afghanistan for the Prime Minister’s office. I’ve completed operational tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, where I worked within a multi-national intelligence environment. The Army really got behind me from the start and gave me opportunities to advance my career.”

HOW TO APPLY

Once your online application has been approved, you'll meet with a local recruiter. This is your chance to tell us about the role that you're interested in. When you go to the Assessment Centre, you'll take tests - the results will show whether you'd be suitable for this role, or should consider a different role.

Training For The Role

Step 1
Basic training teaches you vital combat skills like how to survive outside and fire weapons.

Step 2
Then training teaches you about operational and counter-intelligence. You get an introduction to signals, imagery and human intelligence, as well as a leadership and management course. Training is designed to fit around your day job and is conducted during evenings and weekends.

Entry Requirements

Age: 17 years 9 months - 49 years 6 months
Fitness:
  • Mid Thigh Pull 46kg
  • Medicine Ball Throw 2.9m
  • 2km run 11m 15s (11m 30s for Junior Entry)
More information about the fitness test
Qualifications: Five GCSEs at grade C/4 or above. One must be in English Language and four in academic subjects. If one is not in Maths, you must have Numeracy Level 2.

Qualifications You Could Get After Training

  • Level 4 NVQ
  • All your training will go towards degree level credits in Intelligence and International Relations

Pay and Benefits

You'll get paid a day rate according to your rank, starting from £39.34 in training and rising to £50.21 per day once you're a Private. This includes being paid for weekly drill nights. Plus, if you complete all of your annual training days, you're entitled to a tax-free lump sum called a bounty.

More about Reserve benefits

From the Field

“My first posting was to Northern Ireland, helping the Irish Guards gather intelligence. I was then sent to London to produce papers on Afghanistan for the Prime Minister’s office. I’ve completed operational tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, where I worked within a multi-national intelligence environment. The Army really got behind me from the start and gave me opportunities to advance my career.”

HOW TO APPLY

Once your online application has been approved, you'll meet with a local recruiter. This is your chance to tell us about the role that you're interested in. When you go to the Assessment Centre, you'll take tests - the results will show whether you'd be suitable for this role, or should consider a different role.

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