Recovery Mechanic

Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

Recover vehicles from the battlefield

Craftsman Peters “Recovery Mechanics help keep the wheels on the road to get the job done.”

Out on the battlefield, Army vehicles can get damaged, bogged down and overturned. As a Recovery Mechanic, it’s your job to rescue them. You will use specially adapted tanks and trucks to help you do your job, which is why you will learn to drive a number of Army vehicles in training. You need to be quick-thinking and brave for this role – after all, you’ll be moving vehicles in the middle of battle. You will receive world class training throughout your career in order to develop your trade skills and expertise as a recovery mechanic. All the while, you’ll have sports and other activities to keep you busy and good mates around you.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Help to recover damaged vehicles and rescue stranded soldiers.
  • Work at the centre of the action.
  • Use cranes, lifting gear and training in mechanical theory to work out how to retrieve immobile vehicles.
  • Assess the nature of the vehicle recovery and decide the method of recovery. This may involve the use of winches, ropes, metal cutting equipment or the use of explosives.
  • To keep the fighting forces moving forwards

TRAINING FOR THE ROLE

Step 1 

You'll start with your initial military training which will teach you how to be a soldier - this will cover everything from fieldcraft to how to handle a rifle. If you join as a Junior Soldier (under 17 years 5 months), you’ll do a 23-week basic military training course at Harrogate. If you join as a Regular Soldier (over 17 years 1 month), you’ll do the regular 14-week adult basic training.

 

Step 2

Basic training teaches you to be a soldier, how to survive outdoors and fire weapons. Then it’s off to the Defence School of Electronic and Mechanical Engineering at MoD Lyneham. Over the next 20 weeks, you learn how to drive a variety of military vehicles from cars to tanks. The expert training you receive will enable you to understand the principles of recovery and carry out your critical role.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Age: 16 years 6 months - 35 years 6 months

QUALIFICATIONS: GCSE Grade A–D/9-3 in at least English Language, Maths and Science

FITNESS: Lift 40kg, Carry 60m, 1.5 mile run in 14 min (14 min 30 sec for junior entry)

More information about the fitness test

QUALIFICATIONS YOU COULD GET AFTER TRAINING

  • Level 2 Intermediate Apprenticeship in Engineering Technical Support
  • Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship in Engineering Technical Support
  • Qualifications at different levels, in Leadership and Management
  • Different driving licences
  • Car and HGV licenses + Opportunity for tracked vehicle and plant licenses
  • The Lifting Equipment Engineers Association (LEEA) Part 1 Team Card
  • ADR for the safe recovery of Hazardous vehicles
  • Able to become an Associate Member of the Institute of Vehicle Recovery (IVR)

RANK PROGRESSION

Learn about rank progression here.

PAY & BENEFITS

REGULAR

Earn £15,230 during training. When your Initial training is finished, and you join your unit, your pay will rise to £18,859.

RESERVE

You’ll get paid a day rate according to your rank, starting from £37.47 in training and rising to £46.42 per day once you’re a Private. This includes being paid for weekly drill nights. Plus, if you complete all of your annual training days, you’re entitled to a tax-free lump sum called a bounty. More about Reserve benefits

FROM THE FIELD

“I’ve been in the Army four years. It’s fast paced and hard work, but I wouldn’t change a thing! I had no driving licence when I joined and I’m now a qualified driver with my category B and C and my full C+E licences. I didn’t have to pay anything – in fact, I got paid to do them. I’m a keen ice hockey player and have played all over Europe and Canada. I spent a month in Canada (fully paid). The Army picked up the flights! There’s nothing like this in civvy street. I would recommend the REME to anyone.”

TRAINING FOR THE ROLE

Basic training teaches you to be a soldier, to survive outdoors and fire weapons. Then it’s time to learn how to do your job. We’ll teach you how to bring vehicles back to a safe place where they can be fixed. You’ll also get your driving licence (for a car – category B) and your C+E driving licence (lorry plus trailer) if you don’t have them already. Most Reserve training will fit in with day job.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Age: 17 years 9 months - 49 years 11 months

QUALIFICATIONS: GCSE Grade A–D/9-3 in at least English Language, Maths and Science

FITNESS: Lift 40kg, Carry 60m, 1.5 mile run in 14 min

More information about the fitness test

QUALIFICATIONS YOU COULD GET AFTER TRAINING

  • Level 2 Intermediate Apprenticeship in Engineering Technical Support
  • Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship in Engineering Technical Support
  • Qualifications at different levels, in Leadership and Management

RANK PROGRESSION

Learn about rank progression here.

PAY & BENEFITS

REGULAR

Earn £15,230 during training. When your Initial training is finished, and you join your unit, your pay will rise to £18,859.

RESERVE

You’ll get paid a day rate according to your rank, starting from £37.47 in training and rising to £46.42 per day once you’re a Private. This includes being paid for weekly drill nights. Plus, if you complete all of your annual training days, you’re entitled to a tax-free lump sum called a bounty. More about Reserve benefits

FROM THE FIELD

“I work within a nationally recognised recovery company, so a job as Recovery Mechanic in the Reserves was the obvious choice for me. I was able to bring my existing expertise and travel the world – adding some excitement to my life while getting paid. I’ve been to Afghanistan and on exercise in Canada, while enjoying the benefits of a civilian job. It really is the best of both worlds. I get to do things like a week’s skydiving in Germany and snowboarding in Austria. I would recommend a Reserve job within the REME to anyone.”

HOW TO APPLY?

Once your online application has been approved, you'll meet with a local recruiter. This is your chance to tell us about the role that you're interested in. When you go to the Assessment Centre,you'll take tests - the results will show whether you'd be suitable for this role, or should consider a different role.