Comms Engineer-Installation

Royal Signals

Install fibre networks underpinning Army global communications

"Essentially a well-travelled telecoms engineer, who happens to be in the Army – you install and maintain every piece of cable the Army lays globally."

To stay in touch and support a variety of operations and communications equipment, the Army relies on its telephone and fibre optic network stretching globally between different theatres of operations and standing UK commitments abroad. You will be trained to install and maintain these networks – whether the cables are housed in tunnels or at height, to the battle-proof standard required by the military. You’ll get great technical training and learn about copper and fibre optic cables, local area networks, CCTV and video conferencing. You could earn professional trade status and also qualify to become an Aerial Rigger.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Get trained in the technical skills you need to install, service and repair telephone exchanges and fibre optic networks.
  • Work with CCTV and video conferencing technology.
  • Learn how to drive and operate the vehicles that the communications equipment is transported in, from Land Rovers up to HGVs.
  • Enjoy continuous professional development that will make you highly employable if you return to civilian life. 
  • Get real responsibility straight out of training. 

TRAINING FOR THE ROLE

Step 1
You'll start with your initial military training which will teach you how to be a soldier - this will cover everything from fieldcraft to how to handle a rifle. If you join as a Junior Soldier (under 17 years 5 months), you’ll do a 23-week basic military training course at Harrogate. If you join as a Regular Soldier (over 17 years 1 month), you’ll do the regular 14-week adult basic training.


Step 2
You’ll then study to become a specialist at the Royal School of Signals in Blandford. You'll study how to set up, service and repair telephone networks on our bespoke training area and you will gain the skills you need to work with copper and fibre cabling. You will also learn about video teleconferencing, digital exchanges and network management.:

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Age: 16 years 6 months - 35 years 6 months

QUALIFICATIONS: GCSE Grade A–C/9-4 in at least English Language and GCSE Grade A–C/9-4 in Maths or a science based subject

FITNESS: Lift 30kg, Carry 30m, 1.5 mile run in 14 min (14 min 30 sec for junior entry)

More information about the fitness test

QUALIFICATIONS YOU COULD GET AFTER TRAINING

  • Driving Licences: B+E
  • Level 2 functional skills in Maths, English and IT
  • Technical Certificate in Telecommunications (AES)
  • City and Guilds in Communications Cabling and Basic Electrical Engineering
  • NVQ Level 3 ICT (P)- Advanced apprenticeship in Information Communication Technology (Professional)
  • Professional registration with IET
  • City and Guilds in Designing and Planning networks
  • Higher apprenticeship in ICT (P) (Level 4)

RANK PROGRESSION

Learn about rank progression here.

PAY & BENEFITS

REGULAR

Earn £15,230 during training. When your Initial training is finished, and you join your unit as a Signaller your pay will rise to £18,859.

RESERVE

You’ll get paid a day rate according to your rank, starting from £37.47 in training and rising to £46.42 per day once you’re a Private. This includes being paid for weekly drill nights. Plus, if you complete all of your annual training days, you’re entitled to a tax-free lump sum called a bounty. More about Reserve benefits

FROM THE FIELD

"Mainly working in small surge teams of highly qualified technicians, a large amount of independence and trust is given to installation technicians as they deploy globally. Without doubt the most well travelled trade in the Corps, I have been to the Falkland Islands, the Ascension islands, Cyprus and Kenya, all while building up accreditation towards professional trade status. On Operations, we are a highly sought after resource as the cabled link between headquarters and frontline camps is one of the most important as it underpins the Army’s technological reach in to the battlefield. "

TRAINING FOR THE ROLE

Step 1
You will enter this role with at least one of the three key skills (copper, fibre, structured cabling) gained from either previous Regular service or industry.


Step 2
Additional training courses in the other skills, as well as courses in planning are available. There is also the opportunity to gain experience and skills 'on the job', learning from other experienced Installation Technicians.:

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Age: 17 years 9 months - The day before you turn 50

QUALIFICATIONS: Relevant skills from industry or ex-Regular service (which will be assessed before applications are accepted)

FITNESS: Lift 30kg, Carry 30m, 1.5 mile run in 14 min

More information about the fitness test

QUALIFICATIONS YOU COULD GET AFTER TRAINING

  • Opportunity to gain additional driving licence qualifications
  • Certain courses at the Royal School of Signals attract a City & Guilds award.

RANK PROGRESSION

Learn about rank progression here.

PAY & BENEFITS

REGULAR

Earn £15,230 during training. When your Initial training is finished, and you join your unit as a Signaller your pay will rise to £18,859.

RESERVE

You’ll get paid a day rate according to your rank, starting from £37.47 in training and rising to £46.42 per day once you’re a Private. This includes being paid for weekly drill nights. Plus, if you complete all of your annual training days, you’re entitled to a tax-free lump sum called a bounty. More about Reserve benefits

FROM THE FIELD

"My job lets me deploy with my regular counterparts, use the skills I've picked up in my civvy job and develop myself further. I normally go on tasks with a small team, maybe six other people. I've been all over the world - the Falklands, Cyprus, Brunei and Kenya. The training is great too - I've just done a course on structured network cabling and my civvy boss is interested in using me on a new project at work as a result."

HOW TO APPLY?

Once your online application has been approved, you'll meet with a local recruiter. This is your chance to tell us about the role that you're interested in. When you go to the Assessment Centre,you'll take tests - the results will show whether you'd be suitable for this role, or should consider a different role.