LIFE AS A RESERVIST

From the time you start your training, your time in the Army Reserve will fit around you. If you're at a local unit, regular training nights will allow you to work on your skills and fitness.

You'll also go on exercise to develop your Army field skills at weekends and an annual training camp (2 weeks).

You can also take part in Adventurous Training and sports activities.

 

RESERVE OFFICER BLOG

A ROLE THAT'S RIGHT FOR YOU

If you've already got specialist skills - for example you're a doctor, dentist or chaplain, you can join a specialist national unit. These units meet less often (just ask for 19 days a year), and are a good chance for you to use your skills in new and often challenging environments.

If you're looking to join the Army as an officer, but don't have any specialist qualifications, you'll be warmly welcomed by your local unit. Most Reservists serve locally, and you'll be trained to the high standards needed by the Army.

 

EXPLORE RESERVE ROLES

TAX FREE BONUS

If you meet your minimum training commitment (usually 19 or 27 days), and also pass your Military Training Tests (once a year), you'll get a tax free bonus payment on top of your pay.

This is based on your level of commitment, and varies from £440 in year 1 to £1,742 in year 5.

MORE BENEFITS

Get paid for the time you spend training

You’ll also be included within the Army’s pension scheme

Earn one day paid holiday for every 10 days spent training

YOU'LL ALSO GET...

  • Earn military and civilian qualifications
  • Opportunities to travel
  • Take part in sport and adventurous training

If you're joining the Army Reserve as an ex-regular, you could also benefit from the rejoiners financial incentive.

ONE FOR THE C.V.

Being an Army Reserve officer will add to your CV. There are very few employers who will give a person in their early twenties a team of 25-30 people to lead and manage

DID YOU KNOW?

You can visit your local unit and see for yourself what it's like to serve as an officer in the Army Reserve.