Intelligence Officer

Intelligence Corps

SHAPE OPERATIONS BEFORE THEY BEGIN

"I CAN’T IMAGINE ANOTHER ROLE THAT COULD GIVE ME THE CHANCE TO AFFECT THE DECISIONS OF MILITARY AND GOVERNMENT LEADERS."

You'll lead a team of specialist soldiers in identifying threats, opportunities and new information that supports commanders in charge of thousands of soldiers.

As your career progresses you could find yourself working with front-line units, senior officers at headquarters and even government ministers at a strategic level. You'll get the opportunity to specialise in a particular field, like surveillance or imagery, and could spend time learning a foreign language to a high level.

Training For The Role

Step 1
You begin with Officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, which lasts for 44 weeks. You learn what’s expected of a British Army Officer and how to lead soldiers on and off the battlefield.

Step 2
Next you go on to a specialist course that prepares you to lead Intelligence Corps soldiers. As well as leadership skills you learn about the activities of the Intelligence Corps, including the operational and counter-intelligence roles.

Entry Requirements

Age: 17 years 9 months - 28 years 11 months
Qualifications: 72 UCAS points and 35 ALIS points at GCSE, (including a minimum grade C/4 in English, Maths and a science or foreign language).
Fitness:
  • Mid Thigh Pull 76kg
  • Medicine Ball Throw 3.1m
  • 2km run 10m 15s (multistage fitness test)
More information about the fitness test

Qualifications You Could Get After Training

  • All your training will go towards degree level credits in Intelligence and International Relations

Rank Progression

Learn about rank progression here.

Pay and Benefits

From the Field

“I thought about being a lawyer, but knew it wouldn’t give me the challenges I wanted. I love the outdoors so, armed with the skills I learned at university, the Intelligence Corps was the obvious choice. I can’t imagine another role that could combine all these mental and physical challenges, or give me the chance to affect the decisions of military and government leaders. There’s no job in civilian life that matches it.”

HOW TO APPLY

Once your online application has been approved, you'll have an interview with a recruiter, who will talk to you about the corps that you would like to join. You'll have the chance to learn more about your chosen corps, although you won't make your final decision until you're in training at Sandhurst.

Training For The Role

Step 1
You’ll need to pass the Army Reserve Commissioning Course at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. You can complete this in modules or in one go – depending on your circumstances.

Step 2
After that a specialist course prepares you to lead Intelligence Corps soldiers. As well as leadership skills you learn about the activities of the Intelligence Corps, including the operational and counter-intelligence roles. Most training takes place during evenings and weekends.

Entry Requirements

Age: 17 years 9 months - 48 years 11 months
Fitness:
  • Mid Thigh Pull 76kg
  • Medicine Ball Throw 3.1m
  • 2km run 10m 15s (multistage fitness test)
More information about the fitness test
Qualifications: 72 UCAS points and 35 ALIS points at GCSE, (including a minimum grade C/4 in English, Maths and a science or foreign language).

Qualifications You Could Get After Training

Chartered Institute of Personnel Development Chartered Management Institute City & Guilds Certificate in Human Resource Management Edexel/BTEC Certificate in Management Studies Postgraduate Certificate in Human Resource Management

Pay and Benefits

You’ll get paid a day rate according to your rank, starting from £66.54 once you have passed Army Officer Selection and rising to £79.98 per day once you’ve commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. This includes being paid for weekly drill nights. Plus, if you complete all of your annual training days, you’re entitled to a tax-free lump sum called a bounty.

More about Reserve benefits

From the Field

“I thought about being a lawyer, but knew it wouldn’t give me the challenges I wanted. I love the outdoors so, armed with the skills I learned at university, the Intelligence Corps was the obvious choice. I can’t imagine another role that could combine all these mental and physical challenges, or give me the chance to affect the decisions of military and government leaders. There’s no job in civilian life that matches it.”

HOW TO APPLY

Once your online application has been approved, you'll have an interview with a recruiter, who will talk to you about the corps that you would like to join. You'll have the chance to learn more about your chosen corps, although you won't make your final decision until you're in training at Sandhurst.